Coping With Child Allerigies

It’s no secret that more and more people, including children, are suffering from allergies. It can be especially challenging to deal with allergic kids. However, it can be done, and it’s getting easier to do all the time.

The first thing that parents need to do is to identify all of the allergies their kids are dealing with, as well as the severity of their allergies. A board-certified allergist, who is a medical doctor with specialized training, is your best bet for this. Kids with allergies to one substance are often allergic to other substances, too. You need to know all of the obstacles your child is facing.      

Allergist can also advise you as to how severe your child’s allergies are. Allergy symptoms range from annoying to life-threatening. Of course, the more severe the allergy is, the more drastic the measures that need to be taken.

Your allergist will usually recommend that you take steps to minimize or eliminate your child’s exposure to allergens (the substances that cause allergic reactions). For example, if your child is allergic to seafood, the best solution is to eliminate seafood from his diet. Some substances can’t be eliminated as easily, but they can often be controlled. An example of this is dust allergies.

Managing dust allergies ideally involves modifying the child’s home environment. When he’s home, he spends most of his time sleeping in his bedroom. Therefore, if you’re able to do so, you should replace the carpeting in his room with tile or wood, as carpeting is notorious for harboring dust. That is an expensive undertaking, though, and may not be feasible. In the meantime, at least get him a hypoallergenic pillow or cover, which will help cut down on the dust mite population.

Helping a child manage dust allergies is fairly straightforward, but other allergies will require more involvement from the child, especially as he grows older. Peanut allergies, for instance, are often so severe that children need to avoid all products that were made with peanut oil or that were even produced in a facility that also processes peanuts. Parents of such severely-allergic kids need to diligently study labels to make sure that packaged food contains no vestiges of peanuts and to teach their children to avoid such items for themselves. Teachers can help in such situations, but children need to learn to say, “No, thanks,” to any food they’re not sure about.

Help the child learn to accept his allergies and treat them as a fact of life. If he’s old enough, challenge him to do his own research on allergies. He can decide, within limits, how to accommodate his allergies. If he’s allergic to wheat but wants to eat pizza, for example, help him investigate the wheat-free pizzas that are available. You can check out stores, or Google terms such as “wheat-free pizza.” The wheatless pizzas may not taste exactly the way your child expects them to, but if he has been part of the selection process, he’s more likely to give them a fair chance.

If your child is exhibiting symptoms you think may be caused by allergies, visit an allergist. Follow his recommendations, accept the allergies as a fact of life, and plan how to cope with them. Your child will then be well on his way to effectively managing his allergies and living well in spite of them.

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Coping With Child Allerigies

It’s no secret that more and more people, including children, are suffering from allergies. It can be especially challenging to deal with allergic kids. However, it can be done, and it’s getting easier to do all the time.

The first thing that parents need to do is to identify all of the allergies their kids are dealing with, as well as the severity of their allergies. A board-certified allergist, who is a medical doctor with specialized training, is your best bet for this. Kids with allergies to one substance are often allergic to other substances, too. You need to know all of the obstacles your child is facing.      

Allergist can also advise you as to how severe your child’s allergies are. Allergy symptoms range from annoying to life-threatening. Of course, the more severe the allergy is, the more drastic the measures that need to be taken.

Your allergist will usually recommend that you take steps to minimize or eliminate your child’s exposure to allergens (the substances that cause allergic reactions). For example, if your child is allergic to seafood, the best solution is to eliminate seafood from his diet. Some substances can’t be eliminated as easily, but they can often be controlled. An example of this is dust allergies.

Managing dust allergies ideally involves modifying the child’s home environment. When he’s home, he spends most of his time sleeping in his bedroom. Therefore, if you’re able to do so, you should replace the carpeting in his room with tile or wood, as carpeting is notorious for harboring dust. That is an expensive undertaking, though, and may not be feasible. In the meantime, at least get him a hypoallergenic pillow or cover, which will help cut down on the dust mite population.

Helping a child manage dust allergies is fairly straightforward, but other allergies will require more involvement from the child, especially as he grows older. Peanut allergies, for instance, are often so severe that children need to avoid all products that were made with peanut oil or that were even produced in a facility that also processes peanuts. Parents of such severely-allergic kids need to diligently study labels to make sure that packaged food contains no vestiges of peanuts and to teach their children to avoid such items for themselves. Teachers can help in such situations, but children need to learn to say, “No, thanks,” to any food they’re not sure about.

Help the child learn to accept his allergies and treat them as a fact of life. If he’s old enough, challenge him to do his own research on allergies. He can decide, within limits, how to accommodate his allergies. If he’s allergic to wheat but wants to eat pizza, for example, help him investigate the wheat-free pizzas that are available. You can check out stores, or Google terms such as “wheat-free pizza.” The wheatless pizzas may not taste exactly the way your child expects them to, but if he has been part of the selection process, he’s more likely to give them a fair chance.

If your child is exhibiting symptoms you think may be caused by allergies, visit an allergist. Follow his recommendations, accept the allergies as a fact of life, and plan how to cope with them. Your child will then be well on his way to effectively managing his allergies and living well in spite of them.

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